Book and Calendar Purchases

Book and Calendar Purchase Options

11.07.2015

Grindstone Falls, McConnells Mill State Park

This autumn season has truly had one of the longest sustained periods of vivid fall color in memory. There are still a few trees with color left in them, but most of the leaves have fallen after a period of autumn colors lasting for well over a month. I had some time to spare and took the chance to check out one of the last areas of McConnells Mill State Park that I have not explored, Grindstone Run's Grindstone Falls. At roughly 20 feet, and relatively low flow, these are definitely not the most spectacular falls in the area, especially when compared to the nearby Hell's Hollow Falls and the other falls and rapids of the Slippery Rock Creek Gorge in McConnells Mill State Park. Grindstone Falls is roughly 3 miles south of the mill. 
One of the first things that you notice is the heavy iron on the rocks. This spot, as with many around the state park, is surrounded by current and former polluting mineral extraction. This specific spot is surrounded with former mines and strip mines, as well as a current gas well operation. Map source: USGS
Acid mine drainage has been identified as a continual problem along Grindstone Run, a direct tributary of the Slippery Rock Creek. 
 Sideview
 The view from the top is calm enough
 Back to the sideview. The gorge is pretty large, with a pretty rapid descent. A series of small waterfalls/cascades continues down the gorge to Slippery Rock Creek.
A view down into the gorge from only a few dozen yards down stream. The gorge has an elevation change of roughly 200 feet over a relatively short amount of time. There is a steady set of small cascades and falls that continue to the confluence with the Slippery Rock Creek

No comments :

Post a Comment

Booking.com
Blogger Widget