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8.03.2017

The Awe-Inspiring Kinzua Bridge

The size and magnitude of Kinzua Bridge is incredible. We have taken looks at the bridge in the fall, and in the winter/early spring. Today we take a look at it in the summer. Seeing this bridge in throughout different seasons, weather conditions, and times of the day, make it look vastly different. For more in depth coverage, in addition to views from a misty day in late winter/early spring, check out this article
This was our first visit with the brand new visitors center completed and it really puts context into the bridge and the industrial age that necessitated and ushered in construction of the bridge. The interpretive centers that Pennsylvania State Parks are adding, namely this, Ohiopyle's, and Sinnemohoning's, add so much important educational context. This museum completes the experience and disseminates information that was not readily available at the site before. As someone who is into history, I am naturally drawn to researching this sort of information, but this bridge opens up that information to everyone that visits this spectacular place. They really went out of their way to create an excellent display center that adds critical context to this huge and historic landmark.
One of my favorite aspects of the museum is that they show the workers that sacrificed themselves and made this bridge possible. This aspect is often glossed over, and seeing an ode to the value of labor to our society is so important. 

Some context on the size of the bridge when compared to Lady Liberty. 
One of my favorite displays is of the stereo cards that work to show a time lapse of the history of the bridge.
Some gear that the bridge builders used.
A look out at the bridge from the museum.
There is a model of the original Kinzua Bridge from 1882, prior to reconstruction to handle heavier weight in 1900. The original bridge was built by the Phoenix Iron Works, which was once based in Chester County's Phoenixville.
More neat displays
Now out to the spectacular main attraction, the Kinzua Bridge. The middle section of the bridge was ripped out by an F3 Tornado with winds that approached 100 MPH. 
Even with the bridge not complete, a view from the beginning of it makes it look as if the track goes forever.

The lush Kinzua Gorge
The portion of the bridge that collapsed, remains undisturbed on the floor of the gorge, as a testament to the power of nature.
Looking down one of the giant support towers between rail ties, roughly 200 feet to the gorge floor.
Looking down through the glass skywalk at the end of the bridge.
A view of the twisted support towers from the end of the bridge.
Seeing the power of nature is incredible 
We are fortunate that this much of the bridge remained after that serious storm.
Looking back towards the remaining portion of the bridge.
The scale of everything is so massive and awe-inspiring.


We had a great time!
The current rail line, bypassing the span.
Be sure to check out Kinzua Bridge State Park!

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